ESG and SDGs. Two Complementary Frameworks

The origin of the ESG or Environmental, Social and Governance framework can be traced back to the 70s. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), established by the United Nations General Assembly in 2015, set forth 17 critical areas to address economic, social, and environmental challenges by 2030.

Both frameworks operate under the same principle; the need to establish a sustainable and just global economy.

ESG provides a corporate perspective that encourages companies to highlight their efforts to be socially and environmentally responsible under effective governance. The compatibility with the 17 SDGs, on the left, can be seen in the diagram below.

The ESG framework encourages companies to adopt internal and external policies that change their operations and improve communication with stakeholders including investors, customers and governmental agencies.  The business sector accounts for 72 % of the GDP of the 38 member counties of the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD). With ESG goals, strategies and policies that are effective and timely, businesses can assure that we can all eventually live on a healthy planet within a safe and equitable society.

The alternative is undoubtedly the end of civilization as we know it, especially when considering the impact of SDG #6 (Affordable and Clean Energy) and #13 (Climate Action). Plastic waste in the environment is an example of a very significant issue not included in the United Nations’ SDGs which should also be part of any corporate ESG initiatives.

Competition among companies is the key to a well-functioning, non-monopolistic capitalist  economy. Awareness about ESG and SDG is significantly increasing everywhere and at all levels. Companies are now providing information about their ESG strategies and policies as a way to distinguish themselves from other companies in their industries.  Ultimately it will be up to external stakeholders to insure their implementation and their compatibility with SDG and other similar frameworks such as CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) and the 3 Ps (“people, planet and profit”).

The path towards a sustainable and just economy exists. Currently needed is the means to encourage corporations to proceed forward.

Advance ESG is the only non-profit organization that empowers public stakeholders to effectively influence companies to improve their ESG policies and strategies.  Call it “ESG checks and balances,” the “wisdom of the crowd,” or even “grassroots for sustainability.” It is an approach to ESG advocacy whose time has come.